Syon House revving up for The London Classic Car Show

Syon House revving up for The London Classic Car Show

• Live driving displays on the historic carriageway in front of Syon House
• Spectacular twice daily shows featuring past and present motoring icons
• Entrance to Lime Avenue performances included in the price of admission       
• Advance tickets on sale, offering significant savings for those buying now


Visitors to next month’s eagerly-awaited The London Classic Car Show (25-27 June) will not only savour dazzling displays featuring hundreds of the world’s finest cars from yesteryear – but they will also be treated to the evocative sights and sounds of their favourite automotive icons in heart stirring live action.

 
Adding yet another captivating dimension to the capital city’s ultimate showpiece for classic car owners, collectors, connoisseurs and enthusiasts, selected exhibits from the show’s central ‘Evolution of Design’ feature will be revving up for special parades on the Lime Avenue at the event in Syon Park, West London.

 
“It won’t be fast but it will be spectacular,” vowed Mark Woolley, Show Director. “Can you imagine the truly unique 1896 Salvesen Steam Car brewing up alongside one of the latest supercars or a mighty aero-engined beast from the 1910s spitting flames alongside a beautiful Jaguar E-type from London’s Swinging Sixties – these sights and sounds really are not to be missed.” 

 
Ensuring everyone can savour these eye-catching exploits, dedicated viewing areas will be provided on either side of the tree-lined driveway and admission is included in the great value ticket price. There will be two separate 45-minute performances staged at 12:45 and 15:30 on all three days of the mid-summer car-themed extravaganza.   

 
With its own great history, the majestic Lime Avenue will provide the perfect backdrop for these distinctive motoring pantheons. Back in the 18th century, it was the dramatic culmination to Syon House’s main drive which ran through the surrounding estate as laid out by the illustrious landscaper Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. The carriageway stretched from Robert Adam’s impressive Lion Gate on the London Road (now A315) to the battlemented stately home of the Duke of Northumberland, set on the banks of the River Thames. 
  
 
Today the Lion Gate is permanently closed and instead the westerly drive from Park Road has become the popular estate’s main entrance. The historic Lime Avenue, though, is preserved with its original gravel surface and, conveniently, runs parallel to picturesque parkland where The London Classic Car Show is now sited for 2021.

 
Moreover, the interactive attractions do not stop there. Providing further live entertainment well-known broadcaster Tiff Needell will be interviewing a host of motoring celebrities and luminaries in the busy Talks Theatre while Classic Car Auctions will be on site selling no fewer than 120 highly-desirable classics from magical bygone eras over the weekend. 

 
Add in special anniversary displays to celebrate the centenary of the marque defining Bugatti Brescia and 60 years of the enduringly beautiful Jaguar E-type – as well as a host of glittering displays by classic car dealer and ever-enthusiastic car clubs – and it is easy to see why tickets are proving so popular. 

 
And even more so as the show is taking place on the very first weekend after the planned lifting of all lockdown protocols offering the classic car community the welcome opportunity to reignite their passions and businesses.

 
Adult admission for Friday, Saturday and Sunday costs just £25 when tickets are purchased in advance, rising to £30 on the day. A limited number of Premium Experience Tickets are also on offer for those the ultimate VIP day out.
 
 
Full details of all displays, exhibits and ticket buying options can be found on the official theclassiccarshowuk.com website. Providing reassurance for all ticket buyers, full refunds (excluding booking and transaction fees) will still be offered should the show be cancelled as a result of Covid-19.


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